Bloody Battle Near Niagara by Anonymous

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Bloody Battle Near Niagara Broadside. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress

THE BRITISH, in Canada, proudly display
Their forces, collecting in battle array ;
But when to derange or to strike the Guelphs down,
We wish, or determine,… Scott, Perry and Brown….
‡‡Will prove themselves valiant, and worthy, and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
So Hull, Ransellaer—Burrows, Lawrence and Pike,
On the minds of their chieftains such terror would strike,
As to throw them amaz’d and astonish’d aghast,
With muscles close strain’d… as a shoe to a mast.
‡‡They prov’d themselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
So Bainbridge and Porter, Decatur and Jones,
And all the brave heroes, America owns,
Rodgers, Harrison, Warrington, each glorious name,
In our annals enroll’d and distinguish’d in fame :
‡‡All prove themselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
JOHN BULL once believ’d, in the mischance of War,
When Coercion was substitute, render’d for Law ;
Declar’d as our Rights ; — and enforc’d from the Throne,
For all which, their nation’s best blood did atone.
‡‡We prov’d ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
But now BULLy JOHN, in his dotage and dreams,
Believes us a National people, it seems ;
But ranging as Arbiter round the wide world,
He would have us conform, or to ruin be hurl’d.
‡‡We will prove to JOHN BULL, we are valiant and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
So it seems “ giant ” JOHN — with his ships and his arms,
Intends, for us Yankees, a great many harms ;
But the prodigal now, with his fortune all made,
Is out-law’d in Honor, and bankrupt in Trade.
‡‡While the Yankees are valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
The British, in triumph, establish their Stakes,
Along the Atlantic, and round the great Lakes ;
But away from their posts, they are sure to retreat,
When with equal force match’d ; ’tis their death and defeat
‡‡We prove ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
Lord Wellington’s armies, the Indians and all,
Nor Frauds, nor Blockades shall our FREEDOM enthral,
Our RIGHTS, as our life-blood, are equally dear,
And as true to our Nation…we’re Brave without Fear.
‡‡We prove ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
How many brave heroes, at Chippewa fell ;
Of their actions hereafter shall history tell ;
Embalm’d in our hearts, shall their memories be,
While our hearts uncorrupted shall love LIBERTY.
‡‡For they proved themselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
Brave SCOTT, is a Hero, the Soldier, the Man,
He leads as the chief, and directs in the van ;
To glory he leads, — mid war’s clangor and blaze,
He’s the Victor enlaurell’d, — deserving our praise.
‡‡So prove yourselves valiant, and worthy, and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
Soon the heroic BROWN meets the Canada troops
Unmov’d by their threats, or their shouts or yell-hoops
He offers them battle, on terms to contend,
He fights like a Soldier, but treats like a Friend.
‡‡So fight, ye brave boys, as you’re valiant and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
He captures their garrison ; moves on in arms,
And triumphs as victor, amid their alarms ;
He engages, again and again, on the field ;
Compelling the vanquished Britons to yield.
‡‡Thus prove yourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡I
n battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
On the evening of July, the twenty-fifth day,
Where the moon beams reflect, in Niagara’s spray,
Where the noise of the cataract echoes around,
There Riall and Brown, and their Troops take their ground.
‡‡The Yankees are conq’rors — valiant and free,
‡‡In battles on land, boys, and battles at sea.
Dislodg’d from their strong holds, at ev’ry place,
They fall or surrender, or run with disgrace ;
They attack, they retreat ; — they pant for relief ;
All is lost ! — their best troops — and their ambitious Chief.
‡‡The Yankees are victors…they’re valiant and free,
‡‡In battles on land boys, and battles at sea.
Seven hours rag’d the battle ! — then in silence profound,
The victims and wounded, bestrewing the ground,
Exhibit a scene, which all hearts must deplore,
‘Tis the fate of all WARS ! — but the Battle is o’er !
‡‡We prove ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
Our Heroes, and chiefs, in the Battle, survive ;
Many fall ! — and O ! could brave SPENCER but live !
But in glory, he dies, with his compeers in arms ;
May regret and respect fill the heart as it warms.
‡‡Let us prove ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.
The British are vanquish’d again and again,
On the Lakes, in the field, on each mound, and each plain,
Their DAY-STAR’S bright lustre bedim’d disappears ;
While our glory increases, with th’ increase of years.
‡‡We prove ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on land, boys, and battles at sea.
Drop a tear o’er the scene ; like Leonidas’ band,
Our youth fight and die, at their country’s command :
As “sacred to mem’ry”— triumphantly raise,
Where they fall….monumental inscriptions of Praise.
‡‡They prove themselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on land, boys, and battles at sea.
Be the chief Gen. BROWN, and the brave Gen. SCOTT,
By the Sons of Columbia never forgot ;
May our hearts all unite, in America’s cause,
In defence of our Honor, Rights, Freedom and Laws.
‡‡Thus prove ourselves valiant, and worthy and free,
‡‡In battles on shore, boys, and battles at sea.


Source:  Boston: Printed by N. Coverly, 1814


At head of poem:

BLOODY BATTLE NEAR NIAGARA.

Bloody Battle Near Niagara

The United States’ army, commanded by Major JACOB BROWN, victorious over the British Forces, under the command of Major General RIALL ; “The action commenced on the 25th July, at 5 o’clock P.M. and continued without intermission till midnight.” The enemy was driven at every position ; his battery stormed, and all his artillery taken by the Americans ; Gen. RIALL, 20 officers of rank, and near 300 privates were made prisoners. Generals Brown and Scott severely wounded, the brave Capt. Spencer mortally. The loss on both sides in this severe engagement was very great. The U. S. troops under Gen. Ripley, maintained their position several hours after the action, and then fell back upon Fort Erie as a measure of precaution. Success attend the arms of the UNITED STATES, to effect an honorable and lasting PEACE.

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