Ode to a Bytown Youth by J. A. Murphy

“Enshrined in the records of Canadian achievement a century ago, is the fascinating and thrilling story of a daring feat performed at Brock’s monument on Queenston Heights by a young Bytonian — Matthew Murphy, father of Mr. J.A. Murphy of 412 McLeod Street. Mr. Murphy has penned the following lines relating to the historic incident but fuller details will be found in a story elsewhere on this page.” Ottawa Citizen, December 17, 1938

S.E. View of Brock’s Monument on Queenston Heights as it appeared May 9, A.D.1841
“S.E. View of Brock’s Monument on Queenston Heights as it appeared May 9, A.D.1841”
              I
Well nigh a century ago, Beside Niagara's river, On Queenston Heights was struck a blow Brock's monument to shiver.
A dastard alien's coward hand Had piled within its bottle A quarter hundred powder bags The tower to o'ertopple.
When fired, the blast was strong enough The wooden stair to shatter, Mortar and stone proved all too tough, For such a piffling matter.
As angry embryo nation rose To right the wrong intended, From town and country, copse and close, Their various ways they wended.
Not trains nor aeroplanes, nor cars Conveyed these sturdy yeomen. None carried arms though some bore scars, But all were worthy foemen.
They rode, they ran, they sailed, they swam O'er trails through swamps, wet, dreary; Berries and leaves their stomachs cram, Footsore they were, and weary.
From nearby hills and dales they come, From broad Ontario's beaches, Where'er a spark or loyal flame Gave urge to man the breaches.
Another such determined host Not all our land could muster They frightened rebels from our coast And quelled the Yankee bluster.
Continue reading "Ode to a Bytown Youth by J. A. Murphy"

Niagara (1825) by José María Heredia. Translation attributed to William Cullen Bryant

Portrait of José María Heredia
José María Heredia

      My lyre! give me my lyre! My bosom feels
The glow of inspiration. O how long
Have I been left in darkness since this light
Last visited my brow, Niagara!
Thou with thy rushing waters dost restore
The heavenly gift that sorrow took away.

      Tremendous torrent! For an instant hush
The terrors of thy voice and cast aside
Those wide involving shadows, that my eyes
May see the fearful beauty of thy face!
I am not all unworthy of thy sight,
For from my very boyhood have I loved,
Shunning the meaner track of common minds,
To look on nature in her loftier moods.

      At the fierce rushing of the hurricane,
At the near bursting of the thunderbolt
I have been touched with joy; and when the sea,
Lashed by the wind, hath rocked my bark and showed
Its yawning caves beneath me, I have loved
Its dangers and the wrath of elements.
But never yet the madness of the sea
Hath moved me as thy grandeur moves me now.

      Thou flowest on in quiet, till thy waves
Grow broken ‘midst the rocks; thy current then
Shoots onward like the irresistibel course
Of destiny. Ah, terribly they rage ―
The hoarse and rapid whirlpools there!
My brain grows wild, my senses wander, as I gaze
Upon the hurrying waters, and my sight
Vainly would follow, as toward the verge
Sweeps the wide torrent — waves innumerable
Meet there and madden — waves innumerable
Urge on the overtake the waves before,
And disappear in thunder and in foam.

      They reach — they leap the barrier — the abyss
Swallows insatiable the sinking waves.
A thousand rainbows arch them, and woods
Are deafened with the roar. The violent shock
Shatters to vapor the descending sheets —
A cloudy whirlwind fills the gulf, and heaves
The mighty pyramid of circling mist
To heaven. The solitary hunter near
Pauses with terror in the forest shades.

      What seeks my restless eye? Why are not here,
About the jaws of this abyss, the palms —
Ah — the delicious palms, that on the plains
Of my own native Cuba, spring and spread
Their thickly foliaged summits to the sun,
And, in the breathings of the ocean air,
Wave soft beneath the heaven’s unspotted blue?

      But no, Niagara, — thy forest pines
Are fitter coronal for thee. The palm,
The effeminate myrtle, and frail rose may grow
In gardens, and give out their fragrance there,
Unmanning him who breathes it. Thine it is
To do a nobler office. Generous minds
Behold thee, and are moved, and learn to rise
Above earth’s frivolous pleasures; they partake
Thy grandeur, at the utterance of thy name.

      God of all truth! in other lands I’ve seen
Lying philosophers, blaspheming men,
Questioners of thy mysteries, that draw
Their fellows deep into impiety,
And therefore doth my spirit seek thy face
In earth’s majestic solitudes. Even here
My heart doth open all itself to thee.
In this immensity of loneliness
I feel thy hand upon me. To my ear
The eternal thunder of the cataract brings
Thy voice, and I am humbled as I hear.

      Dread torrent! that with wonder and with fear
Dost overwhelm the soul of him that looks
Upon thee, and dost bear it from itself,
Whence hast thou thy beginning? Who supplies,
Age after age, thy unexhausted springs?
What power hath ordered, that, when all thy weight
Descends into the deep, the swollen waves
Rise not, and roll to overwhlem the earth?

      The Lord hath opened his omnipotent hand,
Covered thy face with clouds, and given his voice
To thy down-rushing waters; he hath girt
Thy terrible forehead with his radiant bow.
I see thy never-resting waters run,
And I bethink me how the tide of time
Sweeps to eternity. So pass of man —
Pass, like a noon-day dream — the blossoming days,
And he awakes to sorrow. I alas!
Feel that my youth is withered, and my brow
Ploughed early with the lines of grief and care.

      Never have I so deeply felt as now
The hopeless solitude, the abandonment,
The anguish of a loveless life. Alas!
How can the impassioned, the unfrozen heart
Be happy without love? I would that one
Beautiful, — worthy to be loved and joined
In love with me, — now shared my lonely walk
On this tremendous brink. ‘T were sweet to see
Her dear face touched with paleness, and become
More beautiful from fear, and overspread
With a faint smile while clinging to my side!
Dreams — dreams. I am an exile, and for me
There is no country and there is no love.

      Hear, dread Niagara, my latest voice!
Yet a few years and the cold earth shall close
Over the bones of him who sings thee now
Thus feelingly. Would that this, my humble verse,
Might be like thee, immortal. I, meanwhile,
Cheerfully passing to the appointed rest,
Might raise my radiant forehead in the clouds
To listen to the echoes of my fame.

Source: Hills, Elijah Clarence (ed). The Odes of Bello, Olmedo and Heredia. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1920.

Did Bryant Translate Heredia’s Ode to Niagara? E. C. Hills, Modern Language Notes
Vol. 34, No. 8 (Dec., 1919), pp. 503-505

Niagara (1825) by José María Heredia. Translated by Dr. Keith Ellis.

Plaque of José María Heredia
Plaque recognizing José María Heredia at the brink of Niagara Falls

Give me, give me my lyre! For I feel
in my aroused and trembling soul
the flame of inspiration! Oh, how much time
has gone by in darkness, my brow deprived
of the gleam of its light…Surging Niagara,
none but your awesome visage can return to me
the divine gift that sorrow with impious hand
cruelly snatched from me.

Oh mighty torrent, be calm and silence
your terrifying thunder: lighten
the mist that shrouds you,
let me ponder your serence face,
fueling thus my fervour.
I am your worthy contemplator: always
disdaining life’s common and petty cares,
I yearned for the extraordinary and the sublime.
The furious hurricane unleashed,
or the thunderbolt booming over my head,
my heart raced with joy. I saw the oceans,
lashed by howling southern winds,
rage against my ship and open
chasms before me, and I loved the danger,
the fury I loved. But all that fierceness
did not move me
as does this your grandeur.

You flow serene, majestic, and then
crashing onto sharp rugged rocks,
violently you dash forward, relentless,
like destiny, irrestistible and blind.
What human voice could describe
the terrifying spectacle
of these roaring rapids? My mind
is lost in vague thoughts,
reflecting on the seething current
that my clouded vision vainly tries
to follow as it sweeps to the wide edge
of so high a cliff. A thousand waves,
moving rapidly like thoughts,
clash in wild fury;
another thousand, and yet another rush to join them,
and amid foam and clamour they disappear.

But still they come…they leap…the horrendous abyss
devours the plunging torrents;
a thousand rainbows criss-cross there,
and the mighty roar resounds in the deafened forests.
Hitting the rocks with terrifying violence
the water breaks, leaping,
and whirling vapour
covers the abyss in swirling clouds; it rises,
circles about, then like a huge pyramid
reaches toward the heavens,
and drifting over the surrounding forests
frightens the solitary hunter.
But, what does my eager gaze
restless, forlorn, search for in you?
Why don’t I see, encircling your immense chasm,
the palm trees, ah! those delicious palm trees,
that on the plains of my beloved Cuba
come to life blessed by the sun’s smile, and flourish;
and in the waft of ocean breezes
sway under a sky of spotless blue?

Ah painful memory…
Oh Niagara, you’ve achieved your fullest destiny,
no crown but the wild pine
more befits your terrible majesty.
Let the palm tree, myrtle and delicate rose
inspire easy pleasures and soft idleness
in giddy gardens; fate held for you
a worthier, loftier end.
Free, generous, strong spirits approach,
observe you, and are amazed;
henceforth they spurn frivolous delights
and feel uplifted at the mention of your name.

Oh God! God of truth! In other climes
I saw detestable monsters
blaspheming your sacrosanct name,
sow error and impious fanaticism,
flood fields with blood and tears,
stir up, despicable fratricidal war,
and in their frenzy desolate the land.
I saw them, and my chest heaved at their sight
in grave indignation. I saw as well
lying philosophers who dared
to question your mysteries, offend you,
and fiendishly drag
miserable men down to lamentable depths.
That’s why my mind, always searching for you
in heightened solitude, is now
in full communion with you. It feels your hand
in this immensity that surrounds me,
and your profound voice touches my heart
in the eternal thunder of these cascading waters.

Amazing torrent!
How the sight of you confounds my spirit,
filling me with terror and wonder!
Where is your beginning? Who has been nourishing
your inexhaustible source as the centuries go by?
What powerful hand
has ordained that on receiving your mighty waters
the ocean does not inundate the land?

The Lord opened his omnipotent hand.
He covered you with restless clouds.
He gave his voice to your tumbling waters,
and adorned with his rainbow your fearsome forehead.
I look at your waters tirelessly flowing
like the long torrent of centuries
rolling along into eternity. Thus mankind’s flowery days
go fleetingly by
and give way to sorrow. Oh! I feel my youth
burnt out, my face withered,
and the profound pain that shakes me
wrinkles with sorrow my clouded brow.

Never have I felt as deeply as now
my wretched isolation, my abandonment,
my anguished lovelessness. How could
a passionate and turbulent soul
be happy without love? Oh! If only a beautiful woman
worthy of me would love me,
and share my wandering thoughts
and my lonely steps
beside this churning abyss.
How I would enjoy seeing a slight paleness
temper her face, more beautiful
in her sweet terror, and see her smile
as I hold her in my loving arms!
Vain ravings!…Oh! I am banished,
without homeland, without love,
with no prospects but tears and sorrow.

Powerful Niagara!
hear my final words! In a few years
a cold tomb will have swallowed up
your feeble singer. May my verses share
your immortal glory! May a kind
traveller on contemplating your face
one day sigh, remembering me.
May I, with the setting sun,
fly joyfully to the Creator’s call,
and on hearing the echoes of my fame,
lift my radiant head above the clouds.

Source: Heredia, José Heredia. Torrente Prodigioso: A Cuban Poet at Niagara Falls. ed. & translated by Keith Ellis. Toronto: Lugus Publications, 1997.

Biography of Dr. Keith Ellis

Niágara (1832) by José María Heredia

Portrait of José María Heredia
José María Heredia

     Templad mi lira, dádmela, que siento
En mi alma estremecida y agitada
Arder la inspiración.   ¡Oh! ¡cuánto tiempo
En tinieblas pasó, sin que mi frente
Brillase con su luz! . . . Niágara undoso,
Tu sublime terror solo podría
Tornarme el don divino, que ensañada
Me robó del dolor la mano impía.

     Torrente prodigioso, calma, calla
Tu trueno aterrador; disipa un tanto
Las tinieblas que en torno te circundan;
Déjame contemplar tu faz serena,
Y de entusiasmo ardiente mi alma llena.
Yo digno soy de contemplarte: siempre
Lo común y mezquino desdeñando,
Ansié por lo terrífico y sublime.
Al despeñarse el huracán furioso,
Al retumbar sobre mi frente el rayo,
Palpitando gocé.   Vi al Oceano,
Azotado por austro proceloso,
Combatir mi bajel, y ante mis plantas
Vórtice hirviente abrir, y amé el peligro,
Mas del mar la fiereza
En mi alma no produjo
La profunda impresión que tu grandeza.

     Sereno corres, majestuoso; y luego,
En ásperos peñascos quebrantado,
Te abalanzas violento, arrebatado,
Como el destino irresistible y ciego.
¿Qué voz humana describir podría
De la sirte rugiente
La aterradora faz?   El alma mía
En vago pensamiento se confunde
Al mirar esa férvida corriente,
Que en vano quiere la turbada vista
En su vuelo seguir al borde obscuro
Del precipicio altísimo.   Mil olas,
Cual pensamiento rápidas pasando,
Chocan, y se enfurecen,
Y otras mil y otras mil ya las alcanzan,
Y entre espuma y fragor desaparecen.

     ¡Ved! ¡llegan, saltan!   El abismo horrendo
Devora los torrentes despeñados:
Crúzanse en él mil iris, y asordados
Vuelven los bosques el fragor tremendo.
En las rígidas peñas
Rómpese el agua: vaporosa nube
Con elástica fuerza
Llena el abismo en torbellino, sube,
Gira en torno, y al éter
Luminosa pirámide levanta,
Y por sobre los montes que le cercan
Al solitario cazador espanta.

     Mas ¿qué en ti busca mi anhelante vista
Con inútil afán?   ¿Por qué no miro
Airededor de tu caverna inmensa
Las palmas ¡ay! las palmas deliciosas,
Que en las llanuras de mi ardiente patria
Nacen del sol a sonrisa, y crecen,
Y al soplo de las brisas del Océano
Bajo un cielo purísimo se mecen?

     Este recuerdo a mi pesar me viene . . .
Nada ¡oh Niágara! falta a tu destino,
Ni otra corona que el agreste pino
A tu terrible majestad conviene.
La palma y mirto y delicada rosa
Muelle placer inspiren y ocio blando
En frívolo jardín: a ti la suerte
Guardó más digno objeto, más sublime.
El alma libre, generosa, fuerte,
Viene, te ve, se asombra,
El mezquino deleite menosprecia,
Y aun se siente elevar cuando te nombra.

     ¡Omnipotente Dios!   En otros climas
Vi monstruos execrables,
Blasfemando tu nombre sacrosanto,
Sembrar error y fanatismo impío,
Los campos inundar en sangre y llanto,
De hermanos atizar la infanda guerra,
Y desolar frenéticos la tierra.
Vilos, y el pecho se inflamó a su vista
En grave indignación.   Por otra parte
Vi mentidos filósofos, que osaban
Escrutar tus misterios, ultarajarte,
Y de impiedad al lamentable abismo
A los míseros hombres arrastraban.
Por eso te buscó mi débil mente
En las sublime soledad; ahora
Entera se abre a ti, tu mano siente
En esta inmensidad que me circunda,
Y tu profunda voz hiere mi seno
De este raudal en el eterno trueno.

     ¡Asombroso torrente!
¡Cómo tu vista el ánimo enajena,
Y de terror y admiración me llena!
¿Dó tu origen está? ¿Quién fertiliza
Por tantos siglos tu inexhausta fuente?
¿Qué poderosa mano
Hace que al recibirte
No rebose en la tierra al Oceano?

     Abrió el Señor su mano omnipotente,
Cubrió tu faz de nubes agitadas,
Dió su voz a tus aguas despeñadas,
Y ornó con su arco tu terrible frente.
¡Ciego, profundo, infatigable corres,
Como el torrente obscuro de los siglos
En insondable eternidad! . . . ¡Al hombre
Huyen así las ilusiones gratas,
Los florecientes días,
Y despierta al dolor! . . . ¡Ay! agostada
Yace mi juventud; mi faz, marchita;
Y la profunda pena que me agita
Ruga mi frente de dolor nublada.

     Nunca tanto senti como este dia
Mi soledad y mísero abandono
Y lamentable desamor . . . ¿Podría
En edad borrascosa
Sin amor ser feliz?   ¡Oh! si una hermosa
Mi cariño fijase,
Y de este abismo al borde turbulento
Mi vago pensamiento
Y ardiente admiración acompañase!
¡Cómo gozara, viéndola cubrirse
De leve palidez, y ser más bella
En su dulce terror, y sonreírse
Al sostenerla mis amantes brazos . . . !
Delirios de virtud . . . ¡Ay!   Desterrado,
Sin patria, sin amores,
Sólo miro ante mí llanto y dolores!

     Niágara poderoso!
¡Adíos! ¡adíos!   Dentro de pocos años
Ya devorado habrá la tumba fría
A tu débil cantor.   ¡Duren mis versos
Cual tu gloria inmotral!   ¡Pueda piadoso,
Viéndote algún viajero,
Dar un suspiro a la memoria mía!
Y al abismarse Febo en occidente,
Feliz yo vuele do el Señor me llama,
Y al escuchar los ecos de mi fama,
Alce en las nubes la rediosa frente.

Source: Hills, Elijah Clarence (ed). The Odes of Bello, Olmedo and Heredia. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1920.

Niágara (1825) by José María Heredia

Portrait of José María Heredia
José María Heredia

Dadme mi lira, dádmela, que siento
en mi alma estremecida y agitada,
arder la inspiración. ¡Oh, cuánto tiempo
en tinieblas pasó, sin que mi frente
brillase con su luz!…Niágara undoso,
sólo tu faz sublime ya podría
tornarme el don divino, que ensañada,
me robó del dolor la mano impía.

Torrente prodigioso, calma, acalla
tu trueno aterrador: disipa un tanto
las tinieblas que en torno te circundan,
y déjame mirar tu faz serena,
y de entusiasmo ardiente mi alma llena.
Yo digno soy de contemplarte: siempre
lo común y mezquino desdeñando,
ansié por lo terrífico y sublime.
Al despeñarse el huracán furioso,
al retumbar sobre mi frente el rayo,
palpitando gocé: vi al oceano,
azotado por austro proceloso,
combatir mi bajel, y ante mis plantas
sus abismos abrir, y amé el peligro,
y sus iras amé: mas su fiereza
en mi alma no dejara
la profunda impresión que tu grandeza.

Corres sereno, y majestuoso, y luego
en ásperos peñascos quebrantado,
te abalanzas violento, arrebatado,
como el destino irresistible y ciego.
¿Qué voz humana describir podría
de la sirte rugiente
la aterradora faz? El alma mía
en vago pensamiento se confunde,
al contemplar la férvida corriente,
que en vano quiere la turbada vista
en su vuelo seguir al borde oscuro
del precipicio altísimo: mil olas,
cual pensaminto rápidas pasando,
chocan, y se enfurecen;
otras mil, y otras mil ya las alcanzan,
y entre espuma y fragor desaparecen.

Mas llegan…saltan…El abismo horrendo
devora los torrentes despeñados;
crúzanse en él mil iris, y asordados
vuelven los bosques el fragor tremendo.
Al golpe violentísimo en las peñas
rómpese el agua, salta, y una nube
de revueltos vapores
cubre el abismo en remolinos, sube,
gira en torno, y al cielo
cual pirámide inmensa se levanta,
y por sobre los bosques que le cercan
al solitario cazador espanta.

Mas, ¿qué en ti busca mi anhelante vista
con inquieto afanar? ¿Por qué no miro
alrededor de tu caverna inmensa
las palmas ¡ay! las palmas deliciosas,
que en las llanuras de mi ardiente patria
nacen del sol a la sonrisa, y crecen,
y al soplo de las brisas del océano
bajo un cielo purísimo se mecen?

Este recuerdo a mi pesar me viene…
Nada ¡oh Niágara! falta a tu destino,
ni otra corona que el agreste pino
a tu terrible majestad conviene.
La palma, y mirto, y delicada rosa,
muelle placer inspiren y ocio blando
en frívolo jardín; a ti la suerte
guardó más digno objeto y más sublime.
El alma libre, generosa, fuerte,
viene, te ve, se asombra,
menosprecia los frívolos deleites,
y aun se siente elevar cuando te nombra.

¡Dios, Dios de la verdad! En otros climas
vi monstruos execrables,
blasfemando tu nombre sacrosanto,
sembrar error y fanatismo impío,
los campos inundar en sangre y llanto,
de hermanos atizar la infanda guerra,
y desolar frenéticos la tierra.
Vilos, y el pecho se inflamó a su vista
en grave indignación. Por otra parte
vi mentidos filósofos que osaban
escrutar tus misterios, ultrajarte,
y de impiedad al lamentable abismo
a los míseros hombres arrastraban.
Por eso siempre te buscó mi mente
en la sublime soledad: ahora
entera se abre a ti; tu mano siente
en esta inmensidad que me circunda,
y tu profunda voz baja a mi seno
de este raudal en el eterno trueno.

¡Asombroso torrente!
¡Cómo tu vista el ánimo enajena
y de terror y admiración me llena!
¿Dó tu origen está? ¿Quién fertiliza
por tantos siglos tu inexhausta fuente?
¿Qué poderosa mano
hace que al recibirte,
no rebose en la tierra el oceano?

Abrió el Señor su mano omnipotente,
cubrió tu faz de nubes agitadas,
dio su voz a tus aguas despeñadas,
y ornó con su arco tu terrible frente.
Miro tus aguas que incansables corren,
como el largo torrente de los siglos
rueda en la eternidad…¡Así del hombre
pasan volando los floridos días,
y despierta al dolor!…¡Ay! agostada
siento mi juventud, mi faz marchita,
y la profunda pena que me agita
ruga mi frente de dolor nublada.

Nunca tanto sentí como este día
mi mísero aislamiento, mi abandono,
mi lamentable desamor…¿Podría
un alma apasionada y borrascosa
sin amor ser feliz?…¡Oh! ¡si una hermosa
digna de mí me amase,
y de este abismo al borde turbulento
mi vago pensamiento
y mi andar solitario acompañase!
¡Cuál gozara al mirar su faz cubrirse
de leve palidez, y ser más bella
en su dulce terror, y sonreírse
al sostenerla mis amantes brazos!…
¡Delirios de virtud!…¡Ay! desterrado,
sin patria, sin amores,
sólo miro ante mí, llanto y dolores.

¡Niágara poderoso!
oye mi última voz: en pocos años
ya devorado habrá la tumba fría
a tu débil cantor. ¡Duren mis versos
cual tu gloria inmortal! Pueda pladoso
al contemplar tu faz algún viajero,
dar un suspiro a la memoria mía.
Y yo, al hundirse el sol en occidente
vuele gozoso do el Creador me llama,
y al escuchar los ecos de mi fama,
alce en las nubes la radiosa frente.

Source: Heredia, José Heredia. Torrente Prodigioso: A Cuban Poet at Niagara Falls. ed. & translated by Keith Ellis. Toronto: Lugus Publications, 1997.